Don’t Break The Streak!

Here’s a quick accountability trick that I’ve been using to help me some of my fitness goals. It’s called ‘Don’t Break the Streak’, and it goes like this.

There’s something you want to improve. For me, it’s push-ups.

  1. Print off a calendar, and hang it someplace conspicuous.
  2. Do SOMETHING every day to get yourself better, and once you do it, check off of that calendar.
  3. Your goal is to make the streak of ‘checked days’ as long as possible.

This gives you a quick visual indicator of your improvement. A steady streak of Xs through days that you can count.

Your job is keep the streak alive, and make the snake as long as possible!

Just like the game.

My Long-Term Goal: Be able to do 50 real push-ups in less than a minute. Given where I am in my fitness, that’s a LONG-term goal.

My Daily Habit: 3 sets of 12 hand release push-ups with between 30 seconds and 60 seconds rest between them. The whole thing takes about 5 minutes to do.

My streak: 6 days (so far).

Quick Tip : Learn by Testing

I have already talked about what to looking for when learning a new programming language. One of the points I brought there was “How do I test my code. Unit testing libraries are available in near every major programming language and are an important tool in the belt!

One way to use unit testing libraries effectively is to use them to give yourself a safe playground for learning other libraries or features of the language.

Say you’re working in the .NET space, and you are trying to learn AutoMapper. One of the easiest ways to try out that library is to spin up a simple unit test project, and test your way into understanding the new framework. Start with simple examples from the docs and assert the values you expect. Try out different functions! Be thorough, and try it all out in the safety of a unit testing project that will not negatively impact your current work.

This has a handy benefit of getting you muscle memory using the library as well.

You can do this for learning programming languages as well. Getting unit tests up and running is a great step in learning a new language, and can be inserted right after the ‘hello world’ step!

Even if you are not a TDD fan, consider starting from scratch with unit testing. Happy coding!